The WEIO Games
KNUCKLE HOP OR SEAL HOP
This is a game of endurance to pain and a testing of strength.
The object is to see how far one can go in a "push-up" position, with elbows bent and knuckles down. The only parts of the body touching the floor are knuckles and toes. From this position, the participant "hops" forward as far as possible keeping the back straight and elbows bent. This games originally was played o n the floor of a traditional community center or hut, or outside on the ground. Now, this game takes place on the arena floor.

FOUR MAN CARRY
Often during a successful hunt there comes a time when the games caught has to be packed for long distances. This is true of packing wood or ice. The for man carry not only test the capability of carrying heaving loads, but it also tests the "weight" - those volunteers "draped" over the participant during the event. Distance is the objective.







EAR WEIGHT
A test of endurance, derived from being able to endure frostbite pain. Before lead weights were used, sacks such as twenty-five pounds of flour were used. Distances of over 2,000 feet were attained.

Technical: The contestant must loop twine attached to a weight around one ear and by lifting straight up, without using the cheek and pack the weight. A designated floor official will walk in front or along side the athlete to guide along the designated/measured section of the arena floor. An athlete may be warned up to three (3) times to correct their form. Measurement of distance is determined from the start line to where the weight drops.

Objective: Each athlete is given one (1) attempt to walk the furthest distance with the weight.

Equipment:
Heavy string/twine, (16) one-pound weights, measuring tape and masking tape to mark 10 foot increments on the floor from a starting point.

EAR PULL
A game of stamina to pain, the victor demonstrates he/she can withstand pain, a trait sometimes needed to survive the harsh realities of the North. Two people will begin a “tug-of-war” with their ears to see who the winner is.

Technical: In this event, there are two people sitting down facing each other with sinew looped around each other’s ear – right ear to right ear, left to left. On a signal from the designated floor official the athletes begin to pull. The athletes must pull straight back keeping their heads straight, no twisting or jerking. The sinew is not allowed to rest on the face. After each round the athlete uses alternate ears. This is a best two out of three match. In the event of a tie, the athletes will wrap the sinew around the ear they won with.

Objective: To pull the sinew off of your opponent’s ear or pull until they give up. The goal is for athletes to work their way through a double elimination bracket.

Equipment: sinew

DROP THE BOMB
This game was designed to test a person’s ultimate strength. Derived from mimicking an airplane form, the participant “drops the bomb” when the athlete can no longer support their own weight.

Technical: Lying chest down on the floor at a starting line, the athlete extends arms out, legs together (airplane). Officials or “spotters” will pick up the athlete from their wrists and ankles and carry the athlete at a paced walk until the athlete can no longer support the position. Athletes are required to keep their backs straight and buttocks low. An athlete will be warned up to three (3) times to correct their form. A designated measured distance will be marked on the arena floor.

Objective: Athletes are given one (1) chance to be carried and hold their form for the longest distance.

Equipment: Measuring tape and masking tape to mark 10 foot increments on the floor from a starting point.

ONE-FOOT HIGH KICK & TWO-FOOT HIGH KICK
Traditionally the coastal whaling villages would use these kicks as a form of communication. When a whale or other game has been taken, a messenger would run back toward the village and when within sight distance the messenger would jump and kick both feet into the air, signaling the people of the village that a whale or other game has been caught and to prepare themselves to help the hunters.

The high kick events require the athlete to jump and kick a suspended object and land on the floor demonstrating balance to the floor officials. The high kicks are considered the premier events of WEIO.

Technical: Traditional One Foot High Kick: (Played on even years) the athlete approaches the ball hopping on one foot, jumps up and kicks the ball with that same foot, landing on that same foot maintaining balance. There are three (3) attempts at each given height and each athlete has three (3) minutes for each attempt. After each successful kick, the ball is raised four (4) inches until the last five (5) competitors. The last five (5) competitors will proceed to the finals round at designated time on the WEIO schedule. For the finals, athletes will warm up and officially continue the event at the last documented measurement. The finalists decide to raise the ball anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least number of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same amount of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Technical: One Foot High Kick: (Played on odd years) The athlete approaches the ball taking off on both feet, jumps up and kicks the ball with one foot, landing on the same foot used to kick the target, maintaining balance. There are three (3) attempts at each given height and each athlete has three (3) minutes for each attempt. After each successful kick, the ball is raised four (4) inches in until the last five (5) competitors. The last five (5) competitors will proceed to the finals round at a designated time on the WEIO schedule. For the finals, athletes will warm up and officially continue the event at the last documented measurement. The finalists decide to raise the ball anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least number of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same amount of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Technical: Two Foot High Kick: The athlete approaches the ball taking off on both feet simultaneously, jumps up and kicks the ball keeping the feet parallel, landing on both feet simultaneously, maintaining balance. There are three (3) attempts at each give height and each athlete is given three minutes for each attempt. After each successful kick, the ball is raised four (4) inches until the last five (5) competitors. The last five (5) competitors will proceed to the finals round at a designated time on the WEIO schedule. For the finals, athletes will warm up and officially continue the event at the last documented measurement. The finalists decide to raise the ball anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least amount of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same amount of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Objective of High Kicks: Successfully kick the suspended target at the highest mark maintaining balance.

Equipment: High Kick Stand, string, and target. Measuring tape or other measuring device.


ONE-HAND REACH
This game was also played during the cold winter months to help maintain physical fitness. This game was developed to demonstrate balance and strength.

Technical: This game requires the athlete to balance on one hand with the elbow tucked under the lower abdominal area. The other hand is used to steady their balance with the rest of the body off the floor, and then reaches for the suspended target. Upon touching the target the athlete can resume the starting position, demonstrating control of balance to the floor officials. There are three (3) attempts at each given height and each athlete has three (3) minutes for each attempt. After each successful touch to raise the ball anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least number of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same amount of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Objective: To touch the suspended target at the highest distance.

Equipment: High Kick Stand, string, target and measuring device.

ALASKAN HIGH KICK
This is a game that was played during the long cold winter months to maintain and test one’s agility.

Technical: The athlete will sit on the floor with one hand holding the opposite foot. The other hand and foot on the floor to establish balance, from a lifted position the athlete will swing u to kick a suspended target, landing on the same foot used to kick the target, maintaining balance. There are three (3) attempts at each given height and each athlete has three (3) minutes for each attempt. After each successful kick, the ball is raised three (3) inches until the last five (5) competitors. The last five (5) competitors will proceed to the finals round at a designated time on the WEIO schedule. For the finals, athletes will warm up and officially continue the event at the last documented measurement. The finalists will decide to raise the ball anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least amount of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same amount of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Objective: Successfully kick the suspended target at the highest mark maintaining balance.

Equipment: High Kick Stand, string and target. Measuring tape or other measuring device.

KNEEL JUMP
Speed and agility are a necessity when out on the ice hunting. The practicality of this event comes from the quickness and control one has to have while out on the ice during break up.

Technical: The athlete sits on the floor with their knees behind a given starting line with the tops of their feet flat on the floor with the soles of their feet up. From this position, the athlete then thrusts their body up and forward to a standing position going for distance and maintaining balance until measured. The athlete is allowed to swing his/her arms back and forth to gain momentum for the leap forward. Athletes are measured from the start line to the nearest heel. Each athlete gets three (3) attempts to jump their farthest.

Objective: To jump the farthest distance while maintaining balance.

Equipment: Measuring Tape, masking tape (to mark starting line).

INDIAN STICK PULL
This game is a test of your grip, mimicking grabbing a fish by the tail. For example; people would have to gather their fish from a fish wheel and toss the fish ashore.

Technical: Grease/shortening is applied to a stick that has been tapered from the center to each end. Competitors then grab the stick, up to the centerline and at a given signal from the floor official attempt to pull the stick from the opponent. They can jerk or twist the stick. Best two out of three is the winner of the match, each round using a different hand. The goal of the athlete is to work their way through a double elimination bracket. In the event of a tie, a coin is flipped to determine which athlete selects the hand to pull with.

Objective: Successfully complete the bracket.

Equipment: A one-foot long dowel, tapered down to one-quarter inch on both ends (center point being one and one half inch in diameter). Grease/shortening and paper towels.

ESKIMO STICK PULL
Strength is an important commodity to have when bringing a seal in from the hole in the ice. Using the legs, arms, back, and a sure grip, the contestants then attempt to pull the stick away from their opponent.

Technical: Opposing athletes sit and face each other with the soles of their feet pressed together with no gap between their feet, and their knees slightly bent. A stick is placed between them above their toes. A coin toss determines the hand position on the stick. Once decided, the athlete positions their hands so that one person has the inside grip of the stick, and the other’s hands are on the outside. All hands must be touching. The winner is the person who pulls their opponent over, or pulls the stick away from opponent. Each round, the athletes will alternate positions of their hands. In the event of a tie, athletes will return to the starting hand position on the stick. Spotters will need to be used to support the athletes upright. Ruling is best out of three using a double elimination bracket.

Objective: Successfully complete the bracket.

Equipment: 1.25 inch in diameter dowel, two feet long and six (6) volunteer spotters.

TOE KICK
This is a game of athletic agility and balance. You must have quick feet and good balance while negotiating the rotten ice during break up.

Technical: The athlete stands at a given starting line, toes to the line, and jumps forward to tap/kick a stick backward with feet parallel landing ahead of the stick’s measured mark. There are three (3) attempts at each given distance. After each successful kick, the stick is moved four (4) inches further away from the start line until the last five (5) competitors. The last five (5) competitors will proceed to the finals round at a designated time on the WEIO schedule. For the finals, athletes will warm up and officially continue the event at the last documented measurement. The finalists decide to move the stick anywhere from 1-4 inches at a time. Tie breaking is determined by misses, the finalist with the least number of misses advances. If more than one finalist has the same number of misses, the athlete with the later miss places above their opponent.

Objective: Jump and kick the stick back at the furthest distance.

Equipment: A foot-long, one-half inch dowel. Measuring tape and masking tape to mark starting point and measured distances.

ARM PULL
Strength is revered when bringing the quarry out of the hole in the ice. This game was developed to prove that strength within the community.

Technical: Two athletes sit on the floor facing each other with one leg over and one leg under their opponent’s leg. Using the arm on the same side of the leg that is over the opponent’s leg, the athletes will lock arms at the elbows. The free hand is placed on the opponent’s ankle. On a signal from the floor official they begin pulling straight back with no jerking, re-gripping or twisting. The athlete must pull their opponent’s arm straight or pull them over. The second round they alternate arm and leg positions. In the event of a tie they will pull with the arm they won with. Ruling is best out of three using a double elimination bracket.

Objective: Successfully complete the bracket.

Equipment: None

NALUKATAQ (BLANKET TOSS)
The Blanket toss or Nalukataq was designed to have fun after a successful whaling season. During the Nalukataq celebration, usually held in June, the whaling crews throw candy from the blanket. The tradition has been adapted to the tourist community so they can have fun when they visit a northern Eskimo community. This blanket is made out of an old whaling skin boat. Boats are made of bearded seal skin (aged with hairs taken off) or split walrus skin (depending on the village). The skin blanket then has holes on the edges so that rope can be looped through all the way around and used for handle grips. One person gets in the middle of the skin and stands there while being tossed. With a good coordinated effort on behalf of the pullers, the person being tossed can get as high as thirty feet in the air and should land on his/her feet without falling down. Sometimes you can see jumpers dancing or running in place and sometimes flips and somersaults are done to the delight of the pullers and spectators. This is quite similar to a trampoline, with the only difference being that people are the springs and they can move to catch an errant jumper.

Technical: The judges look at balance, height and style in the air. All around form and grace are used to determine a winner.

Objective: To be tossed the highest while maintaining grace and balance.

Equipment: Walrus hide or bearded seal skin blanket, 40-50 volunteer pullers and gloves.

FISH CUTTING
The fish-cutting contest derived from the cutting and drying of fish to preserve it for the seasons to come. Because of the volume of fish needed it was important not only to be efficient, but also to be quick.

Technical: Contestant must remove the head, fillet fish keeping tail attached. The contestant must then remove backbone and notch for drying. Contestants are judged for speed and neatness.

Objective: Cut the fish for drying the fastest and neatest.

Equipment: Salmon, stopwatches and paper towel. Floor covering, i.e. plastic and butcher paper. Each contestant must provide his or her own ulu or knife.

SEAL SKINNING
The seal-skinning contest derived from skinning seals. The skin is used to make clothing, the blubber is rendered into oil, and the meat can be cooked, dried, or fermented.

Technical: Each contestant must provide his or her own ulu or knife. The contestant must cut around flippers and remove them or leave them attached to the carcass. Then cut around head and leave it on the carcass. The contestant the must remove skin as neatly as possible. The contestants are judged for speed and neatness.

Objective: To skin the seal the fastest and the neatest.

Equipment: Seal, stopwatches. Floor covering, i.e. plastic and butcher paper. Each contestant must provide his or her own ulu or knife.

MUKTUK EATING
This event is played just for fun!

Technical: Each contestant must provide his/her own ulu or knife. Each contestant is given a piece of Muktuk to eat. On a signal from a designated floor official, every contestant will try to eat his/her piece of Muktuk the fastest.

Objective: To eat your piece of Muktuk the fastest.

Equipment: Muktuk, stopwatches. Floor covering, i.e. plastic and butcher paper. Each contestant must provide his or her own ulu or knife.

GREASED POLE WALK
This game is used to test the balance one may need for crossing creeks, on a wet and slippery log.

Technical: Each contestant starts from one end and must walk on a horizontal greased log while in bare feet. Sliding is not allowed. Spotters are placed on both side of the log to ensure the safety of the contestant. The log will be greased after each contestant. Each contestant has one chance to walk the farthest. The distance is measured from the beginning grease mark to the beginning of the last mark in the grease.

Objective: To walk the farthest without falling off.

Equipment: Shaved smooth log, approximately ten (10) to fifteen (15) feet long, on stands several inches above the ground. Grease or Shortening, measuring device, and paper towels. Floor covering, i.e.

BENCH REACH
This game is played to test ones strength.

Technical: Each athlete kneels on a padded bench with their knees at the edge of the bench. A volunteer sits on the back of the athlete’s lower legs. From this position, the athlete leans forward to set an object on the floor as far away as possible, then return to the original kneeling position. This must be done without any part of the body touching the floor. The object cannot be pushed or tossed. Each athlete will have a total of three attempts. The distance is measured from the bench to the object on the floor.

Objective: To place the object the furthest distance.

Equipment: Padded bench, object that is approximately 1” x 1” x 2”, measuring tape.